Legacy post – Is now the time for Collections in the Cloud?

This post was originally posted to the Collections Trust blog in October 2011. I want you to imagine a scenario with me. Picture your museum. Now imagine it with no servers, no in-house IT team, no Collections data onsite at all. Imagine that all of the software you use to manage your Collections is accessible Read more about Legacy post – Is now the time for Collections in the Cloud?[…]

Legacy post – The Rise and Fall of the Curator

This post was originally posted to the Collections Trust blog on the 14th December 2011. What are the essential ingredients of a museum? If you’d asked this question perhaps 10 years ago, the list would have been pretty straightforward – walls, objects, respectful visitors, curators. The mental archetype of the museum in the popular consciousness Read more about Legacy post – The Rise and Fall of the Curator[…]

Legacy post – Who owns your collections?

This post was originally posted to the Collections Trust blog in December 2011. Yesterday’s announcement about the High Court ruling that the Wedgwood Museum’s collections can be sold as an asset to contribute to the £134m pension shortfall of the Wedgwood company has prompted me to return again to the theme of how fragile a museum’s legal relationship with Read more about Legacy post – Who owns your collections?[…]

Speech to the Living Knowledge Network Launch (03.04.2019)

Good afternoon. I really appreciated this in Roly Keating’s introduction today – “if you put a library somewhere, wonderful things will happen to it”. Or to put it as one librarian put it to me, “if you put a librarian into an empty building, they will turn it into a library”. What makes a library Read more about Speech to the Living Knowledge Network Launch (03.04.2019)[…]

Culture must always be a Commons

This is one of a series of re-posts from blogs I wrote between 2006-2012 since the site they’re on is about to be archived. This was originally published for the Collections Trust (http://www.collectionstrust.org.uk).  In case I haven’t already made it abundantly clear – I love museums, libraries and archives. I think that investing in professional Read more about Culture must always be a Commons[…]

Connecting research and practice in the Information Profession

There is a slide I use in most of my talks about the library and information profession that asserts that we are mid-way through a profound period of transition. Despite the continuity of values and ethics, we are moving away from a well-known, well-established ‘framework’ for the management and delivery of library and information services Read more about Connecting research and practice in the Information Profession[…]

Information Professionals and privacy – a model

Regular readers may be aware that my organisation, CILIP, has recently announced a UK-wide inquiry into the role of Information Professionals in protecting and promoting user privacy in an increasingly connected world. As part of this, I have been giving some thought to how best to define a functional model of the dynamics at play. Read more about Information Professionals and privacy – a model[…]

Assessing Local Authority budgets

For good or ill, our public libraries are intrinsically connected to the Local Authorities that fund and coordinate them. The challenges faced by libraries are less about a direct assault on libraries themselves and more a question of collateral damage arising from the twin policies of devolution and austerity. This being the case, the financial Read more about Assessing Local Authority budgets[…]

Using impact to engage stakeholders – Carnegie UK Trust discussion

I was recently invited by the Carnegie UK Trust to address a meeting of the Library Lab partners on the subject of “using impact to engage stakeholders in competitive environments”. These are the notes of my opening remarks for that session. Using impact in applied environments I think there are two main ways of looking Read more about Using impact to engage stakeholders – Carnegie UK Trust discussion[…]

I can’t ‘get with the programme’ if you don’t have one

A peculiar new feature of public discourse about the EU Referendum and Brexit is the emerging theme that people who voted to Remain in the EU should ‘stop whinging’ and ‘get with the programme’. To which I would reply, quite reasonably in my view, ‘exactly what programme do you think I should get with?’ I Read more about I can’t ‘get with the programme’ if you don’t have one[…]